011 482-3010
All You Need to Know about Colonoscopies: Preparation, Procedure, and Recovery

All You Need to Know about Colonoscopies: Preparation, Procedure, and Recovery

Introduction


If you’re facing a colonoscopy, you’re probably feeling a mix of nerves and anticipation.

It’s normal to feel this way!

A colonoscopy is a medical procedure used to visually examine the large intestine for abnormalities.

The colon, also known as the large intestine, is a long, tube-like organ that is responsible for absorbing water and nutrients from digested food and eliminating solid waste from the body.

A colonoscopy is typically performed as a diagnostic procedure to investigate the cause of symptoms such as abdominal pain, bleeding from the rectum, or changes in bowel habits.

It can also be used as a screening tool to detect early signs of colorectal cancer.

During a colonoscopy, a long, flexible tube equipped with a tiny camera is inserted through the rectum.

The preparation for a colonoscopy involves a special diet and cleansing the colon with laxatives.

Your doctor will give you specific instructions on how to prepare.

The procedure itself is relatively quick, and you will be under sedation the whole time.
Recovery from the sedation can take a few hours, during which you will need to rest.

Most people can return to their normal activities the next day.

So now that you have an overview of this procedure, allow us to cover this topic in depth with some more information on colonoscopies and the benefits of having a colonoscopy done.

what is a colonoscopy - All You Need to Know about Colonoscopies: Preparation, Procedure, and Recovery

 

What is a Colonoscopy

 

A colonoscopy is a medical procedure that allows your doctor to examine the lining of your large intestine (colon) and rectum.

A routine colonoscopy can help find cancerous growths in your colon or rectum. It can also help find and remove precancerous growths, which can help prevent colon cancer. During a colonoscopy, your doctor will insert a long, flexible tube (colonoscope) into your rectum. The colonoscope will be equipped with a light and a camera.

This allows your doctor to see the inside of your colon and rectum. Your doctor may also take biopsies (tissue samples) during the procedure. 

 

Why It Is Done

 

A Colonoscopy will be done for a number of reasons as follow:

Treating a specific issue:
A colonoscopy may be performed to treat an underlying issue and may require insertion of a stent, removal of an object, or polyp removal.

Looking for Colon Polyps
Having one or more polyps removed during one colonoscopy can significantly reduce your risk of colon cancer. If you have had polyps before, talk to your doctor about what your follow-up procedure should be.

Colon Cancer Screening
If you’re 45 or older and at average risk of colon cancer, your doctor may recommend a colonoscopy every 10 years. If you’re between ages 20-44, have a higher risk of colon cancer, or fall into a high-risk group, you can start getting tested at an earlier age.

Testing And Checking for Intestinal Signs and Symptoms
Are you suffering from abdominal pain, rectal bleeding, chronic diarrhea or other intestinal problems?
A colonoscopy can help your doctor explore possible underlying biological or anatomical causes so that you can receive prompt medical attention.

colonoscopy procedure - All You Need to Know about Colonoscopies: Preparation, Procedure, and Recovery

 

How Is It Done?


Your colon, also known as the large intestine, is an important part of your digestive system.

It’s a long, coiled tube that absorbs water and nutrients from the food you eat and eliminates waste from your body.

A colonoscopy is a procedure that allows your doctor to examine the lining of your colon for abnormalities.

The colonoscopy procedure uses a long, flexible, lighted tube (colonoscope) to look at the inside of the colon and rectum.

A colonoscopy is usually done as an outpatient procedure, which means you can go home the same day.

The entire procedure usually takes 30 to 60 minutes. You will be given a sedative through an IV in your arm to help you relax during the procedure.

You will likely be awake but will not be able to remember much of the procedure. 

 

What Are the Risks?

 

There are some risks associated with colonoscopies, but they are generally rare and minor.

The most common risk is bleeding from the site where the tube was inserted.

Other risks include perforation (tearing) of the colon, infection, and reactions to the sedatives used during the procedure.

Another risk could also include a reaction to the sedative used during the exam.

Overall, colonoscopies are safe and effective procedures that can help save lives by detecting colorectal cancer early.

A colonoscopy is generally safe and has very few side effects.

However, as with any medical procedure, there are some risks involved.

 

What Are the Benefits?

 

A colonoscopy can help find ulcers, polyps, tumors, and areas of bleeding and inflammation. It can also be used to collect a tissue sample (biopsy) for testing.

This procedure is also used to screen for colorectal cancer.

A colonoscopy is a safe and effective way to detect and treat many problems of the colon.

It is important to have a colonoscopy if you are 50 years of age or older, or if you have a family history of colorectal cancer or polyps.

It is also used to help diagnose and treat conditions such as Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and irritable bowel syndrome.

 

Preparation for a Colonoscopy

 

The most important part of preparing for a colonoscopy is doing a thorough job of cleansing the colon so that the doctor can get a clear view.

Most people will need to take a laxative the night before the procedure in order to clean out their system.

This can cause cramping, bloating, and diarrhea. It is important to stay hydrated during this time by drinking plenty of clear fluids.

You may also be asked to follow a special diet the day before the procedure, which typically includes clear liquids and light foods.

Instructions for preparation will be advised by your doctor.

colonoscopy preparation procedure - All You Need to Know about Colonoscopies: Preparation, Procedure, and Recovery

How Often Should You Have One

Most people with an average risk for colon cancer should start having colonoscopies at age 50.

If you have a family history of colon cancer or other risk factors, you may need to start colonoscopies earlier.

Your doctor will let you know how often you need to have a colonoscopy based on your individual risk factors.

 

Contact Dr. Schneider


In conclusion, no one likes the idea of having a colonoscopy, but colonoscopies are an important tool in the early detection and prevention of colorectal cancer and can ultimately save your life.

While they may be uncomfortable, the fact is that they save lives. If you are over the age of 50, or if you have a family history of colorectal cancer, be sure to talk to your doctor about getting a colonoscopy.

Having a colonoscopy is an important part of maintaining your health, and it’s not as bad as you may think.

But it is important to understand the benefit of having a colonoscopy done.

While some polyps are benign, others can develop into cancer. Anyone can get colon polyps, but there are certain risk factors that increase your chances of developing them.

These include age, family history, smoking, and certain medical conditions. If you have any of these risk factors, it’s important to talk to your doctor about ways to reduce your risk.

If you are concerned about colon polyps, talk to us today to book your appointment.

For further reading on the procedures we perform, please visit our website or contact Dr. Schneider on 011-482-3010. 

 

DISCLAIMER: PLEASE READ CAREFULLY

The information on this website is to provide general guidance. In no way does any of the information provided reflect definitive medical advice and self-diagnoses should not be made based on information obtained online. It is important to consult a Gastroenterologist or medical doctor regarding ANY and ALL symptoms or signs including, but not limited to: abdominal pain, haemorrhoids or anal / rectal bleeding as it may a sign of a serious illness or condition. A thorough consultation and examination should ALWAYS be performed for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. Be sure to call a physician or call our office today and schedule a consultation.

Polypectomy: Everything You Need to Know About This Common Medical Procedure

Polypectomy: Everything You Need to Know About This Common Medical Procedure

 Overview

A polypectomy is a medical procedure in which a polyp (a small, abnormal growth) is removed from the lining of the colon or rectum.

Polyps are usually benign (not cancerous), but some may be precancerous, which means they could develop into cancer over time.

Polypectomy can be performed as an outpatient procedure using local anesthesia.

Polyps are found during a colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy, which are procedures that allow your doctor to look at the lining of your colon or rectum.   The doctor inserts a lighted scope into the rectum and removes the polyps with a surgical instrument.

Polyps can vary in size, from a few millimeters to several centimeters.  They may be single or multiple, and they may grow on the inside lining of the colon or rectum.

In this article we talk about the purpose of a polypectomy, how it is performed, and the complications associated with having a polypectomy performed.

Polyps Explained


A colon polyp is a small, benign growth that forms on the lining of the colon. Although they are usually harmless, they can sometimes become cancerous.

Polyps are relatively common, and most people will develop at least one at some point in their lives. However, there are several risk factors that can increase your chances of developing them, including age, family history, and certain medical conditions.

There are also a few different types of colon polyps, which can range in size from a few millimeters to several centimeters.

Treatment for colon polyps usually involves surgery to remove them. However, in some cases, they may be monitored with regular colonoscopies. 

polyps explained - Polypectomy: Everything You Need to Know About This Common Medical Procedure

 

What Is the Purpose of a Polypectomy?


Polypectomy is a common procedure that is safe and effective in preventing colon cancer.

Polypectomies are performed for a variety of reasons, including to prevent cancer, to remove a source of bleeding, or to relieve symptoms such as abdominal pain or diarrhea.

The procedure is relatively simple and is often performed as an outpatient procedure.


How Is a Polypectomy Performed?

A polypectomy can be performed in a number of ways, depending on the size and location of the polyp. The most common method is a colonoscopy.

A colonoscopy is an examination that enables your gastroenterologist to examine the lining of your colon (large intestine).

The GI inserts a colonoscope (a flexible tube with a camera at the tip) into the rectum and large intestine to carefully inspect the colon to look for signs of cancer or pre-cancerous lesions.

A clean colon is essential for the gastroenterologist to do an accurate examination for polyps or other abnormalities.

The most popular colonoscopy preparation method used involves drinking polyethylene glycol (PEG).

It is odorless, tasteless, and is mixed with certain clear liquids. PEG is to be drank along with other clear liquids the day before the scheduled procedure.

Your gastroenterologist will discuss with you your options and advise the best preparation method for you.

If the complex polyp is benign, with no signs of cancer present, then the patient may choose non-surgical removal instead of surgery.

If your gastroenterologist believes that removal of the polyp is needed, a wire loop or snare will be passed through the colonoscope.

This will sever the polyp from the intestinal wall via an electrical current, a procedure known as polypectomy.

Gastroenterologists usually recommend a colonoscopy when you turn 50, however, adults with a high risk and family history of colorectal cancer may need a colonoscopy at a younger age and more frequently.

It’s important to note that you will probably have other than your colonoscopy over the years, such as fecal occult blood tests, which can be a symptom of colon cancer.

 

polypectomy explained - Polypectomy: Everything You Need to Know About This Common Medical Procedure

What Are the Risks and Complications Associated with A Polypectomy?

 

The possible risks associated with a polypectomy procedure can include perforation of the bowel or rectal bleeding.

These risks are similar to those associated with a colonoscopy.

Although complications from either procedure are relatively rare, it is important to contact your doctor immediately if you experience any of the following symptoms:

Fever / Chills
If you are experiencing a fever or chills, it is important to seek medical attention as this could be indicative of an infection.

Heavy Bleeding / Sever Pain / Bloating
If you are experiencing heavy bleeding, severe pain or bloating in your abdomen, or vomiting, please seek medical attention immediately.

Irregular Heartbeat
An irregular heartbeat can also be a sign of a serious condition, so please do not hesitate to seek medical care if you are experiencing this symptom.

 

Who Is at Risk for Polyps?

Anyone can develop a polyp, but certain factors can increase your risk.

These include:

  • Older age
  • A personal history of colorectal cancer or polyps
  • Family history of colorectal cancer
  • Personal history of inflammatory bowel disease, and certain inherited syndromes.

In most cases, polyps do not cause symptoms.

If they do, the most common symptom is bleeding from the rectum or blood in the stool.


What Is the Recovery Time for A Polypectomy?

After a polypectomy, it is recommended that you do not drive for 24 hours.

Recovery typically does not take long, and minor side effects such as gassiness, bloating, and cramps usually go away within 24 hours.

If the procedure was more involved, however, a full recovery can take up to two weeks.

Your doctor will provide you with post-operative care instructions.

You may be asked to avoid consuming certain beverages and foods that can irritate your digestive system for two to three days following the procedure.

These can include:

  • Spicy Food
  • Alcohol
  • Sodas
  • Coffee
  • Tea

A follow-up colonoscopy will most likely be scheduled for you by your doctor.  It is crucial to confirm that the polypectomy was successful and that no additional polyps have developed.

colonoscopy explained - Polypectomy: Everything You Need to Know About This Common Medical Procedure

The Importance of Cancer Screening

When you are diagnosed with colonic polyps your doctor may want you to have more frequent screening to monitor your condition and prevent colon cancer.

Cancer screening is an important part of staying healthy.

It can help find cancer early, when it’s easier to treat. There are different types of cancer screenings. Some tests look for cancer before you have any symptoms.

 Other tests are used to find cancer after you have symptoms. Talk to your doctor about which screenings are right for you based on your age, health history, family history, and other factors.

polypectomy infographic - Polypectomy: Everything You Need to Know About This Common Medical Procedure

 

Contact Dr. Schneider

In conclusion, it is important to understand the risks and causes of colon polyps in order to take steps to prevent them.

Polypectomy is a common medical procedure that is used to remove abnormal growths from the colon.

It is a safe and effective way to treat colon cancer, and it can also be used to remove precancerous polyps from the colon.

Polypectomy is usually performed on an outpatient basis, and most people recover from the procedure quickly and without complication

While some polyps are benign, others can develop into cancer.

Anyone can get colon polyps, but there are certain risk factors that increase your chances of developing them.

These include age, family history, smoking, and certain medical conditions. If you have any of these risk factors, it’s important to talk to your doctor about ways to reduce your risk.

If you are concerned about colon polyps, talk to us today to book your appointment.

For further reading on the procedures we perform, please visit our website or contact Dr. Schneider on 011-482-3010. 

 

DISCLAIMER: PLEASE READ CAREFULLY

The information on this website is to provide general guidance. In no way does any of the information provided reflect definitive medical advice and self-diagnoses should not be made based on information obtained online. It is important to consult a Gastroenterologist or medical doctor regarding ANY and ALL symptoms or signs including, but not limited to: abdominal pain, haemorrhoids or anal / rectal bleeding as it may a sign of a serious illness or condition. A thorough consultation and examination should ALWAYS be performed for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. Be sure to call a physician or call our office today and schedule a consultation.

What is a Colon Polyp?

What is a Colon Polyp?

A colon polyp, also called a colonic polyp or a colorectal polyp, is a small, benign growth that forms on the lining of the colon.

While most colon polyps are harmless, some may develop into cancer. The majority of colon polyps are adenomatous polyps, which are made up of glandular cells.

Polyps can occur in many locations in the body, including ears, nose, uterus or throat.

Other types of colon polyps include inflammatory polyps, hamartomatous polyps, and hyperplastic polyps.

Colon polyps can be found during a colonoscopy, a procedure in which a long, flexible tube is inserted into the rectum and passed through the entire length of the colon.

During a colonoscopy, the doctor may do a removal of a colon polyp.

In this article we will discuss more on the symptoms of colon polyps, causes and diagnosis.

 

Colon Polyp Types

 

There are three main types of colon polyps: adenomatous, hyperplastic, and inflammatory. Each type has different characteristics and may pose different risks for cancer.

Adenomatous polyps are the most common type of colon polyp and are generally considered to be premalignant.

Hyperplastic polyps are the least likely to become cancerous. Inflammatory polyps are a type of polyp that can be caused by inflammation in the colon.

 

Symptoms of Colon Polyps

 

Polyps are more commonly found in the rectum and sigmoid colon. However, they may be found anywhere in the large intestine.

Symptoms of colon polyps include:

  • Bleeding from the rectum after a bowel movement
  • Blood in the stool
  • Change in stool color
  • Diarrhea
  • Constipation lasting
  • Abdominal pain
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Fatigue

If you experience any of these symptoms, it’s important to see a doctor so they can determine whether or not you have colon polyps.

 colon polyps - What is a Colon Polyp?


What Causes Colon Polyps?

 

Colon polyps are very common. Most people have them and don’t even know it.

The exact cause of colon polyps is unknown. However, there are some risk factors that may increase your chance of developing them.

These include:

 

Diagnosis of Colon Polyps


Colon polyps are typically diagnosed during a colonoscopy, which is a procedure where a doctor inserts a long, thin tube with a camera attached into the rectum and colon.

During the procedure, the doctor will remove any polyps that are found. It is important to get regular colonoscopies, as they can help to detect colon polyps early, before they have a chance to turn into cancer.

If you have any family history of colon cancer, or if you are over the age of 50, it is important for you to have regular cancer screenings as prevention or early detection which may save your life.

There are several screening tests that can be used to detect polyps or colorectal cancer, including stool tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, and virtual colonoscopy.

 

Stool Test 
Stool DNA testing is intended to screen for colon cancer or precancerous polyps in people with no symptoms. The stool DNA test detects abnormal DNA and small amounts of blood shed into the stool from colon cancer or colon polyps.

Flexible Sigmoidoscopy
A flexible sigmoidoscopy is a thin, flexible tube that is inserted through the rectum to examine the last third of the large intestine (sigmoid colon) for polyps or cancer.

Colonoscopy
A colonoscopy is a medical procedure used to visualize the inside of the large intestine (colon) and rectum.

A colonoscopy is performed using a colonoscope, a long, flexible, lighted tube. The colonoscope is inserted through the rectum into the colon to examine the inside of the colon for abnormal growths, inflammation, ulcers, bleeding, or other problems.

Virtual Colonoscopy
Virtual colonoscopy is a cutting-edge technology that allows doctors to get a clear view of the inside of the colon without having to go through the traditional, invasive colonoscopy procedure.

This technology is revolutionizing the way colon cancer is detected and treated.
 

colonscopy polyp removal - What is a Colon Polyp?

Treatment Options for Colon Polyps


There are several treatment options for colon polyps, which are growths on the lining of the colon or rectum.

Treatment may be recommended if a polyp is large, if there are multiple polyps, or if a polyp is precancerous.

Treatment options include polypectomy, which is removal of the polyp during a colonoscopy, and ablation, which is destruction of the polyp. Surgery may also be an option.

Although virtual colonoscopy is a useful tool for visualizing the entire colon, it does not provide the same level of detail as colonoscopy.

Colonoscopy is the only procedure that enables both visualization and removal of polyps, making it the gold standard for diagnosing and treating potential problems in the colon.

 

Risk Factors

 

There are many different risk factors for colon polyps, and it is important to be aware of them.

Age is the most important risk factor, with the majority of colon polyps occurring in people over the age of 50.

Other risk factors include a family history of colon polyps or colorectal cancer, a personal history of colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, and certain genetic syndromes.

Some lifestyle factors may also increase the risk of colon polyps, such as smoking, obesity, and a diet high in fat and red meat.

If you have any of these risk factors, it is important to talk to your doctor about how to best reduce your risk.

 

Can Colon Polyps Be Prevented?

 

Prevention of colon polyps is important because they can develop into cancer. There are many things you can do to lower your risk.

Maintaining a healthy lifestyle is important for many reasons, including reducing the risk of developing colon polyps.

While colon polyps are not always cancerous, they can be a precursor to cancer.

Fortunately, there are things you can do to help prevent the development of colon polyps:

  • Eating a healthy diet
  • Exercising regularly
  • Avoiding smoking are all good ways to reduce your risk
  • Maintain a healthy weight

If you have a family history of colon cancer, you may need to be extra careful and get screened more often.

Talk to your doctor about what is right for you.

 healthy diet with colon polyps - What is a Colon Polyp?

 

Why Colon Cancer Screening is Important
 

Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States, yet it is one of the most preventable cancers.

Screening tests can find precancerous polyps so they can be removed before they turn into cancer.

The American Cancer Society recommends that people at average risk for colon cancer start regular screening at age 50.

People with a family history of colon cancer or other conditions that increase the risk should start screening earlier.

Screening for colon cancer can help prevent these deaths by finding cancer early, when it is most likely to be curable.

 

Contact Dr. Schneider


In conclusion, it is important to understand the risks and causes of colon polyps in order to take steps to prevent them.

While some polyps are benign, others can develop into cancer.

Anyone can get colon polyps, but there are certain risk factors that increase your chances of developing them.

These include age, family history, smoking, and certain medical conditions. If you have any of these risk factors, it’s important to talk to your doctor about ways to reduce your risk.

If you are concerned about colon polyps, talk to us today to book your appointment.

For further reading on the procedures we perform, please visit our website or contact Dr. Schneider on 011-482-3010.

DISCLAIMER: PLEASE READ CAREFULLY

The information on this website is to provide general guidance. In no way does any of the information provided reflect definitive medical advice and self-diagnoses should not be made based on information obtained online. It is important to consult a Gastroenterologist or medical doctor regarding ANY and ALL symptoms or signs including, but not limited to: abdominal pain, haemorrhoids or anal / rectal bleeding as it may a sign of a serious illness or condition. A thorough consultation and examination should ALWAYS be performed for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. Be sure to call a physician or call our office today and schedule a consultation.

Constipation – Symptoms, Causes, Treatment, and Prevention.

Constipation – Symptoms, Causes, Treatment, and Prevention.

 

What is Constipation

 

Constipation is a condition in which a person has difficulty passing stool.

This may cause a person to feel bloated and uncomfortable. There are many possible causes of constipation, including a lack of fiber in the diet, dehydration, and certain medications.

Having less than three bowel movements a week is, technically the definition of constipation.

Constipation is often treated with home remedies, such as increasing fiber intake and drinking plenty of fluids. More severe cases may require medical treatment.

Constipation is a common problem that can be treated at home with lifestyle changes and home remedies.

Other key features that usually define constipation include:

  • Dry / hard stool
  • Painful bowel movement and difficulty passing stool
  • The feeling that you have not fully emptied your bowel

If constipation persists, you should consider seeing a doctor.

In this article we discuss everything about constipation and the prevention and treatment thereof.

What Causes Constipation?

There are many different things that can cause constipation. Some of the more common causes include not eating enough fiber, not drinking enough water, and not getting enough exercise.

Constipation can also be a side effect of certain medications. If you are constipated, it is important to see your doctor to rule out any underlying medical conditions.

There are a few things you can do to help relieve constipation. If you are constipated, your doctor may recommend a stool softener or laxative.

 

Symptoms of Constipation

 

Symptoms can vary from person to person, but the most common symptoms are as follows:

  • The feeling of not having completely emptied your bowel
  • Feeling nauseous
  • Feeling bloated
  • Having stomach cramps
  • Having stomachache
  • Difficulty in passing stools
  • Dry or hard/lumpy stools
  • You have less that 3 bowel movements a week 

 

Diagnosis of Constipation


To diagnose constipation, your doctor will ask about your medical history and your diet.

Your doctor may also do a physical exam. This may include a rectal exam.

If your doctor suspects that another condition is causing your constipation, you may need tests, such as a CT scan or an MRI.

These tests can help find the cause of your constipation.

 

Untitled 900 × 600 px 1 - Constipation – Symptoms, Causes, Treatment, and Prevention.

 

Complications of Constipation

If you’re constipated, you may not be able to have a bowel movement.

This can cause stool to build up in your intestines, which can lead to complications such as the following:

  • Hemorrhoids
  • Anal fissures
  • Intestinal blockages.

If you’re constipated for more than a week, you should see a doctor. They may prescribe a laxative or enema to help you relieve constipation.

In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove impacted stool from your intestines.

Constipation can be uncomfortable and even painful. But it’s important to treat it so it doesn’t lead to more serious complications.

 

Finding the Cause of Constipation

Depending on your symptoms, medical history and overall health, your doctor may order several test or procedures to determine what the cause of your constipation is.

 

Lab Testing

Your doctor might order a blood or urine test to see if there are signs of hypothyroidism, diabetes, or anemia.

Stool Testing

A stool sample might be requested to check for signs of infection, cancer, or inflammation.

Imaging Test

CT (computed tomography), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or lower gastrointestinal tract series may be ordered to identify problems that could be the cause of your constipation.

Colonoscopy

A colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy– an internal view of your colon with a scope – may be performed. During this procedure, a small sample of tissue (biopsy) may be taken to test for cancer or other problems, and any found polyps will be removed.

 

How to Treat Constipation

If you’re anything like the average person, you probably don’t think much about your bowel movements.

But when you’re backed up, it’s all you can think about. Constipation is one of the most common gastrointestinal problems, and it’s responsible for some pretty uncomfortable symptoms.

The good news is that there are things you can do to ease the pain and get things moving again.

Here are a few tips for treating constipation:

  • Drink plenty of fluids
  • Staying hydrated is key for keeping your digestive system running smoothly.
  • When you’re constipated, aim for six to eight glasses of water a day.
  • Eat more fiber.

 Home Remedies for Constipation

 

Are you suffering from constipation?

Don’t worry, you’re not alone. According to the National Institutes of Health, about 4 million Americans suffer from constipation every year.

There are many different home remedies for constipation that can help relieve your symptoms.

Some of the most popular home remedies include:

  • Eat more fiber in your diet
  • Avoid dairy
  • Eat prunes
  • Drink magnesium citrate
  • Eat prebiotic foods
  • Try a FODMAP diet
  • Over-the-counter laxatives
  • Take probiotic supplements

Untitled 900 × 600 px 2 - Constipation – Symptoms, Causes, Treatment, and Prevention.

 

Dietary Changes to Consider:

 

If you are constipated, you may want to consider increasing your dietary fiber intake.

There are many high-fiber foods that you can eat to help relieve constipation.

Some of these foods include:

  • Fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Whole grain breads and cereals
  • Beans and lentils
  • Nuts and seeds

If you are having trouble getting enough fiber in your diet, you may want to consider taking a fiber supplement.

 

Untitled 900 × 600 px - Constipation – Symptoms, Causes, Treatment, and Prevention.

 

 Over-the-counter Treatments for constipation

 

If you’re struggling with constipation, you’re not alone.

There are a number of over-the-counter treatments that can help relieve constipation. The first step is to increase your fluid intake.

This will help to soften your stools and make them easier to pass. Aim for eight glasses of water a day. You can also try adding prune juice or lemon juice to your water.

There are a number of over-the-counter laxatives that can help relieve constipation. These include stool softeners, fiber supplements, and enemas. Be sure to follow the directions on the package.

 

Other Medical Treatments

 

There are a variety of other medical treatments for constipation. If you have tried dietary changes and increased physical activity, and your constipation persists, you may want to talk to your doctor about other options.

One medical treatment for constipation is laxatives. Laxatives work by softening the stool and increasing the frequency of bowel movements.

There are different types of laxatives, and your doctor can help you determine which type is right for you.

Another medical treatment for constipation is enemas. Enemas work by flushing out the rectum and colon with fluid. This can help to soften the stool and make it easier to pass.

 

Prevention of Constipation

 

There are a few things that you can do to help prevent constipation.

First, make sure that you are drinking enough fluids. This will help to keep your stool soft.

Second, eat plenty of high-fiber foods. These will help to add bulk to your stool and make it easier to pass. Following a healthy diet is important if you are already struggling with constipation.

Third, make sure that you are getting enough exercise. This will help to keep your digestive system moving.

Lastly, if you are having trouble going, try using a stool softener or laxative. These can help to make it easier to pass stool.

 Untitled 900 × 600 px 3 - Constipation – Symptoms, Causes, Treatment, and Prevention.

 

When To See a Gastroenterologist

There is no definitive answer to the question of when to see a gastroenterologist. However, there are some general guidelines that can help you decide when to seek medical help.

If you are experiencing any of the following symptoms, you should see a gastroenterologist as soon as possible:

  • Persistent nausea or vomiting
    Abdominal pain or cramping
    • Bleeding from the rectum
    • Unexplained weight loss
     

For more information on the diagnosis and treatment of constipation in Johannesburg, contact Dr. Schneider or book your consultation today.

DISCLAIMER: PLEASE READ CAREFULLY

The information on this website is to provide general guidance. In no way does any of the information provided reflect definitive medical advice and self-diagnoses should not be made based on information obtained online. It is important to consult a Gastroenterologist or medical doctor regarding ANY and ALL symptoms or signs including, but not limited to: abdominal pain, haemorrhoids or anal / rectal bleeding as it may a sign of a serious illness or condition. A thorough consultation and examination should ALWAYS be performed for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. Be sure to call a physician or call our office today and schedule a consultation.

[39350 _i=”0″ _address=”2.0.0.0″ /]
The Symptoms and Treatment Options for Colon Polyps

The Symptoms and Treatment Options for Colon Polyps

What are Colon Polyps?

 

A polyp is a growth that develops on the inner lining of the colon or rectum.

It is an abnormal tissue growth that resembles little, flat bumps, or mushroom-like stalks.
The majority of polyps are tiny, measuring less than half an inch in diameter.

Polyps can be either be benign or cancerous. Benign polyps are not cancerous and typically do not cause any problems.

Cancerous polyps, on the other hand, can invade and damage nearby tissue and can spread cancer cells to other parts of the body.

Most colon polyps are small and do not cause any problems. However, some colon polyps can grow large enough to block the intestine or to bleed. Colon polyps that bleed can cause iron-deficiency anemia.

Polyps are common, and most are not cancerous. However, some polyps can become cancerous over time.

Polyps are usually detected during a routine colonoscopy. Removal of polyps during a colonoscopy is a common and safe procedure.
Early detection is crucial for treatment and prevention of colon cancer.

 

Explanation of Colon Polyps Symptoms

 

Polyps vary in size from a tiny dot to a large growth.

Most colon polyps do not cause any symptoms. If a polyp does cause symptoms, they may include:

  • Blood in the stool
  • Rectal bleeding
  • Feeling that you have to have a bowel movement even after having one
  • Constant urge to have a bowel movement
  • Fullness in the stomach after eating a small amount of food
  • Pain in the abdomen or rectum
  • Change in bowel habits, such as diarrhea or constipation

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, it is important to see a doctor to determine if you have colon polyps.

polyps removal colonoscopy - The Symptoms and Treatment Options for Colon Polyps

Diagnosis

Polyps are usually found during a routine screening test, such as a colonoscopy.

If a polyp is found, your doctor will likely remove it during the colonoscopy. This is done to determine if the polyp is cancerous.

 

How to Prevent Colon Polyp

It is important to be proactive about your health and to be aware of the risks associated with developing colon polyps.

While colon polyps are not always cancerous, they can be a precursor to cancer.

Fortunately, there are things you can do to help prevent the development of colon polyps. Some of the best ways to prevent colon polyps include:

  • Eating a healthy diet
  • Exercising regularly
  • Maintaining a healthy weight

Finding the Right Treatment for Colon Cancer

Colon cancer is a serious disease that can be treated if it is found early.

One way to find cancer early is to get screened for colon polyps. Colon polyps can become cancerous over time, so it’s important to get them removed.

There are different ways to remove colon polyps. Some polyps can be removed with a special tool that is inserted through the rectum. Other polyps may need to be removed surgically. If you have colon polyps, it’s important to find the right treatment for colon cancer.

Colon polyps can also be removed with a laser or by freezing them. If the polyps are small and not causing any problems, your doctor may simply keep an eye on them.

Talk to your doctor about the best treatment for you.
 

colon polyps colonoscope - The Symptoms and Treatment Options for Colon Polyps

How to Manage Colon Polyps

Most people will never experience a colon polyp, but for those who do, it can be a frightening experience.

Colon polyps are typically small, but they can grow large enough to block the intestine. Colon polyps can also become cancerous, so it’s important to get them removed if they are found.

Here are a few ways to manage colon polyps:


Eating a Healthy Diet

Most people know that eating a healthy diet is important for maintaining a healthy weight, but what many people don’t realize is that eating a healthy diet is also important for maintaining good health overall.

This is especially true when it comes to preventing colon polyps.

There are a few simple things you can do to help keep your colon healthy and reduce your risk of developing colon polyps.

First, make sure to eat plenty of fruits and vegetables. Fruits and vegetables are a good source of fiber, which is important for keeping your digestive system healthy.

Second, avoid eating processed foods and foods high in sodium. Processed foods are often high in unhealthy fats and sodium, which can increase your risk of developing colon polyps.

 

Exercising Regularly

There is evidence that points to regular exercise helping to reduce the risk of developing colon polyps, a precursor to colorectal cancer.

A study published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology; Biomarkers & Prevention found that individuals who exercised regularly were less likely to develop colon polyps.

The study found that those who exercised between three and five times a week were 24% less likely to develop colon polyps.

The study also found that those who exercised more than five times a week were 33% less likely to develop colon polyps.

While the study found a correlation between regular exercise and a reduced risk of developing colon polyps, it did not prove that regular exercise prevents colon polyps from forming.

 

Managing Stress

Managing stress is an important part of preventing colon polyps. When a person is under a lot of stress, the body releases hormones like cortisol that can increase the risk of developing polyps.

There are a few things that people can do to help manage their stress. Some people find that exercise is a good way to relieve stress.

Exercising releases endorphins, which can help to make a person feel better. Some people find that yoga or meditation can also help to reduce stress.

Another way to manage stress is to take some time for yourself. This can mean taking a relaxing bath, reading, or taking a walk.

It is important to find something that you enjoy and that helps you to relax.

 

Taking Medications

If you’ve been diagnosed with colon polyps, your doctor will likely prescribe medications to help remove them.

There are a few different types of medications that can be used, and the one your doctor prescribes will depend on the size and type of polyps.

There are two categories of medications that are typically used to treat colon polyps:

  • Polyp elimination medications – These medications are designed to help the body eliminate the polyps.
  • Medications to reduce the risk of polyp recurrence – These medications are designed to help keep the polyps from coming back.

What Happens During Colonoscopy?

 

A Colonoscopy is used to look inside the colon to find any potential problems that may be hiding.

This is done by inserting the end of a long, flexible tube called a Colonoscope into the Rectum.

The tip of the Colonoscope has a mini light and camera on the end. Once the end of the Colonoscope has been inserted, the doctor can slowly push it through the Rectum and into the colon, while taking pictures of any abnormalities.

If you are experiencing the following symptoms, you should make an appointment with your GP:

  • Stomach pains
  • Abdominal discomfort
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Rectal bleeding
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Abdominal swelling
  • Unexplained nausea or vomiting

The process can be uncomfortable, but your doctor is there to help ensure that you’re as comfortable as possible the entire time.

They will give you a sedative that will make you drowsy and then you will be given a bowel cleansing solution to take the night before the exam to empty your bowels.

colon polyps colonoscopy 1 - The Symptoms and Treatment Options for Colon Polyps

Conclusion

If you are concerned about colon polyps, talk to us today to book your appointment.

For further reading on the procedures we perform, please visit our website or contact Dr. Schneider on 011-482-3010.

DISCLAIMER: PLEASE READ CAREFULLY

The information on this website is to provide general guidance. In no way does any of the information provided reflect definitive medical advice and self-diagnoses should not be made based on information obtained online. It is important to consult a Gastroenterologist or medical doctor regarding ANY and ALL symptoms or signs including, but not limited to: abdominal pain, haemorrhoids or anal / rectal bleeding as it may a sign of a serious illness or condition. A thorough consultation and examination should ALWAYS be performed for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. Be sure to call a physician or call our office today and schedule a consultation.

Your Complete Guide to a Colonoscopy

Your Complete Guide to a Colonoscopy

 

Overview


Colonoscopy is the most widespread colon cancer screening procedure in existence.

It has been shown to detect early-stage adenomas and colorectal cancers at a curable stage.

Approximately 50% of colorectal tumors are located in the distal colon and colonoscopy has also been shown to be effective at detecting these lesions too.

Despite this, many patients believe that this test is more risky than it actually is due to concerns about bowel preparation and the general unpleasantness.

Let’s get more in depth about the Colonoscopy procedure and when to consider getting it done.

 

What is a Colonoscopy?

 

A Colonoscopy is used to look inside the colon to find any potential problems that may be hiding.

This is done by inserting the end of a long, flexible tube called a Colonoscope into the Rectum.

The tip of the Colonoscope has a mini light and camera on the end. Once the end of the Colonoscope has been inserted, the doctor can slowly push it through the Rectum and into the colon, while taking pictures of any abnormalities.

If you are experiencing the following symptoms, you should make an appointment with your GP:

  • Stomach pains
  • Abdominal discomfort
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Rectal bleeding
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Abdominal swelling
  • Unexplained nausea or vomiting

colonoscopy procedure scaled - Your Complete Guide to a Colonoscopy

 

When to Get a Colonoscopy

Colonoscopies are often recommended to people over the age of 50 in order to screen for possible colon cancer in the early stages.

If your family history includes colon cancer, doctors may recommend that you start having a colonoscopy at an earlier age.

If you have symptoms that could be caused by colon cancer, your doctor may recommend a colonoscopy to diagnose the problem.

If you are at risk for colon cancer, make sure to talk to your doctor about when you should start getting a colonoscopy.

 

A colonoscopy is performed to detect:

You may also need a colonoscopy if you experience these symptoms:

  • Rectal bleeding
  • Changes in bowel habits or appearance in stool
  • Chronic diarrhea
  • Chronic abdominal pain

colon polyp removal - Your Complete Guide to a Colonoscopy

 

Don’t Wait Until You Suffer from Polyps

 

The colon is the last part of your digestive tract.

Polyps are small fleshy growths that can form in the colon. They are often harmless, but if they grow large enough, they can block the passage of stool.

This can lead to an infection known as colitis, or colon cancer, which is one of the most common cancers in adults.

Therefore, it’s important to get screened regularly. The best way to get screened for polyps is to take a colonoscopy.

The procedure is done under sedation and takes only about 15 minutes. The doctor will examine the entire length of your colon to find any polyps. There are many reasons why you should not wait until you’re suffering from polyps.

 

How a Colonoscopy Works

 

The process can be uncomfortable, but your doctor is there to help ensure that you’re as comfortable as possible the entire time.

They will give you a sedative that will make you drowsy and then you will be given a bowel cleansing solution to take the night before the exam to empty your bowels.

The idea behind a colonoscopy is to find and remove any polyps, which can be precancerous and even cancerous.

Polyps can grow inside the colon, and they can cause many problems, such as intense abdominal pains and bleeding.

 

Before your Colonoscopy: Things to Do and Consider Before Your Colonoscopy

 

In preparation for a colonoscopy, there are a few things you can do to make the process easier.

– Schedule your colonoscopy appointment as far in advance as possible.

– Consider if you should take a stool softener and/or laxative before your procedure.

– If needed, begin a low fiber diet before your colonoscopy.

– Avoid eating solid foods the day before and shortly after your colonoscopy.

– Order and collect your medications the night before the procedure.

– Pack your medications, snacks, and water bottles to take with you to the hospital.

– Pack a change of clothes and toiletries, as well as a book or magazine, for your recovery time.

colon polyps colonoscopy - Your Complete Guide to a Colonoscopy

What to Expect During a Colonoscopy

 

A Colonoscopy is an examination of the entire colon, the rectum, and the anus, used to screen for colorectal cancer or other colorectal abnormalities.

A colonoscopy is typically done without sedation. It can be done on your hands and knees (called flexed knee), sitting, or standing.

A Colonoscopy is done in the doctor’s office or hospital. You will either be given anesthesia or pain medication before the procedure. A doctor will use various tools to guide the colonoscope through your large intestine and take images of your colon, rectum, and anus.

 

During Your Colonoscopy: What to Expect During Your Colonoscopy

 

The examination is conducted on the inside of the large intestine (colon) and examines any polyps that may be present.

A colonoscopy is a procedure in which the doctor inserts a tube-like instrument into your colon, also known as large intestine or large bowel, to examine the lining of the colon.

It is a non-invasive procedure, and no anesthesia is required for this test.

If a polyp is spotted during this procedure, it can be biopsied and removed through the same small incision made by the insertion of the endoscope.

A polyp is an abnormal growth inside of the colon that doctors suspect may turn into cancer if it remains untreated. Food or stool particles are expelled as soon as examination using a suction tube attached to the endoscope has been concluded.

The patient will be able to go home soon after treatment.

 

After a Colonoscopy: Things to Consider After Your Colonoscopy

 

Many people feel that a colonoscopy is an unpleasant and uncomfortable experience.

It can be both, but with preparation and aftercare, this process can be done without too much discomfort. There are many things to be concerned with after your colonoscopy, and we will discuss them here.

  • Avoid heavy lifting and strenuous exercise.
    It is important to avoid heavy lifting and strenuous exercise for at least 48 hours after your procedure. This will help to reduce the risk of bleeding and discomfort in the abdomen.
  • Do not eat solid food the day of your colonoscopy.

After a colonoscopy, a doctor will likely recommend the following:

  • Water
  • Drinks with electrolytes
  • Vegetable or fruit juices
  • Crackers
  • Herbal tea
  • Mashed potatoes
  • Soup
  • Scrambled eggs

Risks and Benefits of a Colonoscopy

 

The colonoscopy procedure is safe and effective. But it can sometimes cause bleeding, inflammation or infection in pouches in the colon called diverticulum.

The main advantage of getting a colonoscopy is that it helps identify early signs of cancer and allows your physician to remove polyps before they can become invasive.

According to the National Cancer Institute, colorectal cancer is the third most common form of cancer in men and women.

 Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of Copy of WHAT IS A - Your Complete Guide to a Colonoscopy

Contact an Expert

If you are concerned about abdominal pain and wish to schedule a colonoscopy –  talk to us today.

Call your gastroenterologist for advice if any unexpected symptoms occur, including:

  • Persistent nausea
  • Persistent but minor bleeding
  • Ongoing bloating and abdominal discomfort

We recommend going directly to the emergency room if the patient experiences any of the following:

  • Severe abdominal pain
  • Heavy bleeding from the anus (rectum)
  • Vomiting

Dr. Schneider is here to provide you with expert medical advice in the field of gastroenterology.

Book an appointment online or contact us on 011 482-3010 to find out more.

DISCLAIMER: PLEASE READ CAREFULLY

The information on this website is to provide general guidance. In no way does any of the information provided reflect definitive medical advice and self-diagnoses should not be made based on information obtained online. It is important to consult a Gastroenterologist or medical doctor regarding ANY and ALL symptoms or signs including, but not limited to: abdominal pain, haemorrhoids or anal / rectal bleeding as it may a sign of a serious illness or condition. A thorough consultation and examination should ALWAYS be performed for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. Be sure to call a physician or call our office today and schedule a consultation.